Literature/Media

The Scoop on Cultural Appropriation

There’s an old proverb that says imitation is the highest form of flattery. But is it really? Emulating styles, traditions, clothing, and even hairstyles from other cultures has become popularized in modern times. However, this imitation can cross some serious lines. This is where the term cultural appropriation comes into play. What is cultural appropriation?Continue reading “The Scoop on Cultural Appropriation”

Anthropology Through Film

Movies and Documentaries are excellent vehicles for studying anthropology, and the use of film to study humanity has greatly increased with the rise in technology. By helping people visualize events, films can provide new perspectives on the culture and lifestyle of people. Contrary to written publications, films tend to be more captivating towards audiences andContinue reading “Anthropology Through Film”

The Dark Side of Chocolate

Like most people, I love the sweet, earthy taste of good chocolate. From chocolate chip pancakes to brownies, I consume chocolate quite often. However, I never considered the sourcing of my chocolate until recently. I always took the nestle semisweet chocolate chip bags on the grocery store shelf for granted and did not think aboutContinue reading “The Dark Side of Chocolate”

The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures by Anne Fadiman.

In The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, Anthropologist Anne Fadiman studies a refugee family from Laos and their experience in California hospitals. Fadiman examines the cross-cultural conflicts and lack of cultural relativism in the medical field. She chose to focus her research on the Hmong population in Merced, California, particularly the Lee family.Continue reading “The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures by Anne Fadiman.”

Digital Ethnography

During the Covid-19 Pandemic, anthropologists face immediate limitations on their research. The Covid-19 restrictions mean ethnography is no longer an ethically appropriate research strategy. Furthermore, anthropologists, as social scientists, must remain cognizant of the wellbeing of the groups they are striving to understand. Although ethnographers are used to instability and disruptions in their fieldwork, recentContinue reading “Digital Ethnography”

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